Category Archives: praying

Gisbertus Voetius – Spiritual Desertion – 1659 – Chapter One, Part One

This book is recorded – {narrated} from the title Spiritual Desertion with the kind permission of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society. www.dutchreformed.org .   It is the narrator’s opinion that it is unequaled regarding the subject in which it treats. The opinion is based on the use of the spiritual/clinical terms that are not even employed in our day. (1) because the relation of Christian experience is often more superficial (2) if the distressed is even asked to delineate them at all – often the feelings are suppressed or there is little patience to deal with these subjects at this level. (3) because the best authors are understood and quoted by this author from a bygone day that even though now are available on line are rarely consulted with the patience that is required to read the old English.  Special thanks to Reformation Heritage Books and my dear friends David Woolin, and Dr. Joel Beeke as well. Chapter one part one is the definition of terms. In this chapter the difference between melacholia and desertion are examined.

Spiritual Desertion – Chapter one Part one

John Owen – Of Temptation Chapter 6 7 8

Let a soul in such an estate awake and look about him. His enemy is at hand, and he is ready to fall into such a condition as may cost him dear all the days of his life. His present estate is bad enough in itself; but it is an indication of that which is worse that lies at the door. The disciples that were with Christ in the mount had not only a bodily, but a spiritual drowsiness upon them. What says our Savior to them? “Arise; watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation.” We know how near one of them was to a bitter hour of temptation, and not watching as he ought, he immediately entered into it.

Treatise of Temptation Chapters 6 and 7

Thomas Shepard – Compunction for Sin – From the Sound Believer

The second act of Christ’s power is compunction, or sense of sin. 1. This compunction immediately follows conviction. 2. The necessity of this to succeed the other. 3. Wherein it consists. 4. The measure of it in all the elect.

Compunction for Sin

Andrew Gray – THE BELIEVER’S LOVE TO AN UNSEEN CHRIST

It is a love that does not rise upon any outward motive, or extrinsical consideration; it is a love rising from the exercise of a gracious frame of spirit, as the result of that union betwixt the head and the members: it would have Him, although, as long as it is within time, it never did behold Him.

THE BELIEVER’S LOVE TO AN UNSEEN CHRIST

Edward Payson – THE SIN, DANGER, AND UNREASONABLENESS OF DESPAIR.

How unreasonable then is it to despair of mercy; while this season, this opportunity of obtaining mercy is afforded; unless you are determined not to improve it. The precious privileges which you enjoy, while this season continues, render despair still more unreasonable. What walls are these which surround you? Are they not the walls of God’s house, a place where he has recorded his name, and respecting which he says, Wherever I record my name, there will I meet with you and bless you?

THE SIN, DANGER, AND UNREASONABLENESS OF DESPAIR.

A W Pink -The Christian in Romans 7

The one who bows to the solemn and searching teaching of God’s Word, the one who there learns the awful wreckage which sin has wrought in the human constitution, the one who sees the exalted standard of holiness which God has set before us, cannot fail to discover what a vile wretch he is. If he is given to behold how far short he falls of attaining to God’s standard; if, in the light of the divine sanctuary, he discovers how little he resembles the Christ of God; then will he find this language most suited to express his godly sorrow. If God reveals to him the coldness of his love, the pride of his heart, the wanderings of his mind, the evil that defiles his godliest acts, he will cry, “O wretched man that I am.”

The Christians in Romans 7

Hugh Martin – The Shadow of Calvary

“Jesus often met there with His disciples.” (John 18:2)

Would it not be well if disciples often met there with Jesus? Is there not, indeed, a sense in which Gethsemane ought to be regarded as the very oratoire of the Church, the closet, spiritually, where we may, with many precious aids to faith, pray to our Father who sees in secret and rewards openly, as we shall see He rewarded the Man of Sorrows?

The Shadow of Calvary Chapter 2

Pike and Hayward’s Cases of Conscience – Case 11 Doubting Salvation.

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The most settled and general part of my unbelief may appear by the following hints, viz. I cannot view Jesus Christ in that loveliness, excellency, and preeminence, as I find him set forth in the word of truth. I cannot find sufficient ability in my soul to believe in him, wholly and unfeignedly ; and how can I believe in him, without a right view of him ? Sometimes I can set him forth to others, in the words and light of Scripture, so that I believe many of the children of God have their very souls nourished and fed by what I say: and upon certain times I myself am much delighted in, and with the work ; but when I retire into myself, and consider the barrenness of my soul, my strangeness to, and alienation from God, Jesus Christ?

Cases of Conscience – Despair Unbelief