Category Archives: law work

William Huntington – The Kingdom of Heaven Taken By Prayer

But suddenly it was impressed with power on my mind, that all these evils were brought upon me for my sin: and that I neither knew, feared, loved, nor served, God as I ought to do, and therefore had brought these trials on myself; and that it was a great mercy God did not take me instead of the infant. This impression was attended with an uncommon flow of contrition: insomuch that I was, at times, overwhelmed with a sorrowful spirit; and so dissolved into meekness, that I went weeping and mourning all the day long, until “my soul was as a weaned child.” William Huntington (1745-1813)

Kingdom of Heaven Taken By Prayer

John Owen – Of Temptation Chapter 5

It is a woeful thing to consider what slight thoughts the most have of this thing. So men can keep themselves from sin itself in open action, they are content, they scarce aim at more; on any temptation in the world, all sorts of men will venture at any time. How will young men put themselves on company, any society; at first, being delighted with evil company, then with the evil of the company! How vain are all admonitions and exhortations to them to take heed of such persons, debauched in themselves, corrupters of others, destroyers of souls!

Of Temptation Chapter 5

Charles Spurgeon – Story of Spurgeon’s Conversion

I cried to God with groanings—I say it without exaggeration—groanings that cannot be uttered! And oh, how I sought, in my poor dark way, to overcome first one sin and then another, and so to do better, in God’s strength, against the enemies that assailed me, and not, thank God, altogether without success, though still the battle had been lost unless He had come who is the Overcomer of sin and the Deliverer of His people, and had put the hosts to flight.

The Conversion of Charles Spurgeon

Thomas Sullivan – Did the Puritans Really Teach Preparationism? 3 of 3

From the website, International Outreach, “The proper method of seeking involves man’s doing all that is in his natural power to seek God. One of the most common expressions in Puritan writings is “use the means.” Today this expression is almost unknown in Christianity and in books on evangelism. If it were used, most people, even Reformed people, would not know what was meant by it. It is, however, an encouragement to seek God using the means which God had provided for men to come to know Him. Although it is not in man’s moral ability to find God, it is in his natural ability to do certain things which might increase the possibility of his being saved or put him in a way of salvation. The Puritans constantly urged upon men the necessity of doing all they could. ”   

Did the Puritans Teach Preparationism? Part 3