Gisbertus Voetius – Spiritual Desertion – 1659 Chapter 1 Part 2

This book is recorded – {narrated} from the title Spiritual Desertion with the kind permission of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society. www.dutchreformed.org .   It is the narrator’s opinion that it is unequaled regarding the subject in which it treats. The opinion is based on the use of the spiritual/clinical terms that are not even employed in our day. (1) because the relation of Christian experience is often more superficial (2) if the distressed is even asked to delineate them at all – often the feelings are suppressed or there is little patience to deal with these subjects at this level. (3) because the best authors are understood and quoted by this author from a bygone day that even though now are available on line are rarely consulted with the patience that is required to read the old English.

____ In part two of this chapter the Kinds of Desertions is discussed with their remedies. Also some helpful bibliographical sources.

Spiritual Desertion – Chapter One Part Two

 

Gisbertus Voetius – Spiritual Desertion – 1659 – Chapter One, Part One

This book is recorded – {narrated} from the title Spiritual Desertion with the kind permission of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society. www.dutchreformed.org .   It is the narrator’s opinion that it is unequaled regarding the subject in which it treats. The opinion is based on the use of the spiritual/clinical terms that are not even employed in our day. (1) because the relation of Christian experience is often more superficial (2) if the distressed is even asked to delineate them at all – often the feelings are suppressed or there is little patience to deal with these subjects at this level. (3) because the best authors are understood and quoted by this author from a bygone day that even though now are available on line are rarely consulted with the patience that is required to read the old English.  Special thanks to Reformation Heritage Books and my dear friends David Woolin, and Dr. Joel Beeke as well. Chapter one part one is the definition of terms. In this chapter the difference between melacholia and desertion are examined.

Spiritual Desertion – Chapter one Part one

Gisbertus Voetius – Spiritual Desertion – 1659 – Introduction

This book is recorded – {narrated} from the title Spiritual Desertion with the kind permission of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society. www.dutchreformed.org It is the narrator’s opinion that it is unequaled regarding the subject that it treats. The opinion is based on the use of the spiritual/clinical terms that are not even employed in our day. (1) because the relation of Christian experience is often more superficial (2) if the distressed is even asked to delineate them at all – often the feelings are suppressed or there is little patience to deal with these subjects at this level. (3) because the best authors are understood and quoted by this author from a bygone day that even though now are available on line are rarely consulted with the patience that is required to read the old English.  Special thanks to Reformation Heritage Books and my dear friends David Woolin, and Dr. Joel Beeke as well.

Spiritual Desertion – Introduction

 

 

United Presbyterian 1853 – Review of the Works of John Owen

This is a review of Owen’s works from the United Presbyterian 1853. It is the second review from a Presbyterian periodical for the same year. This would mean that the Goold edition of Owen’s works had just been released. They were published in Edinburgh

Review of a new publication of John Owen’s Works

Matthew Henry – You Shall be Hated of All Men for My Name’s Sake

Here is very much said to that purpose, and all little enough, considering the many hardships they were to grapple with, throughout the course of their ministry, and their present weakness, which was such, as that, without some powerful support, they could scarcely bear even the prospect of such usage; Christ therefore shows them why they should be of good cheer.

You shall be hated of all men for my name’s sake

John Howe – 1630-1705 – The Carnal Mind’s Enmity to God

The carnal mind is enmity to God, and the effects of this enmity are obvious. This alienation from God is voluntary, affected and chosen: men in their unconverted state, are not only strangers to God, but enemies against God, and that in their minds. A most fearful case, full of astonishment, that the very mind of man, the offspring of God—the paternal mind, as a heathen called him—that this most excellent part or power belonging to the nature of man, should be poisoned with malignity, and envenomed with enmity, against the glorious, ever-blessed God!

The Carnal Mind at Enmity to God

James Fraser – That Which I Would, I Don’t Do – But the Evil That I Hate, I Do.

I find a law in my members, which hath in some degree taken possession of all my faculties, giving false light and prejudice to my mind and judgment ; a corrupt bias often to my will, putting my affections and passions in irregular and impetuous motion, and so warring against the law of my mind, that good principle and law, which God, according to the promise of the new covenant hath put in my mind, and written in my heart; so warring againt my soul (1 Pet. ii. 11) and labouring hard, and with too much success in some particular instances, to captivate me to the law of sin which is in my members.
 
The Evil that I Hate, I do