John Warton – Death Bed Scenes – Infidelity – 1828

From the chapter, ” Having thus begun with tolerably good omens, I proceeded to inquire about his sickness, expressing my fears that it was both painful and dangerous. In answer he was very communicative; and it appeared that his disorder was distressing in the extreme; a vast mass of water collecting perpetually, and discharging itself through every pore of his body; and his respiration being at times so much impeded, that he had scarcely breath enough to tell me his own story. He had been at the nearest hospital, in an early stage of his complaint, when it seemed to be within the reach of art; but had unwisely returned home, before the proper system was tried, because he was deprived of many little things which he considered essential to his comfort. Since this the disorder had increased rapidly; yet he would not admit any idea of danger. In fact, he was manifestly afraid to die”

Death Bed Scenes – Infidelity 1828